3rd New Jersey Regiment
~ Jersey Greys ~

Private & Officer Talking Soldiers Enjoying A Laugh Camp Food Laughing At A Joke Mourning Arms

Gallery

Battle of Germantown, October 2016

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Battle of Brooklyn Heights, September 2016

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New York Historical Society, August 2016

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Summer Drill at Fort Montgomery, August 2016

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Defiance & Independence at Fort Ticonderoga, July 2016

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Battle of Monmouth, June 2016

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Fort Ticonderoga Hut Construction, June 2016

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Fort Ticonderoga Redoubt Construction, May 2016

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Jockey Hollow Spring Encampment, April 2016

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New York Historical Society, March 2016

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Winter Drill at New Bridge Landing, February 2016

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Battle of Princeton Real Time Tour, January 2016

Early January 1777, the Continental Army was fresh off success, but under massive threat from the British. Day's before, General Washington had successfully taken the Hessians at Trenton and defended Trenton on second battle. Now he was on the march and escaped in the middle of the night behind the British. Washington knew the Rear Guard of the British was vulnerable. If he could catch them before he met up with the rest of the army, he could have possibly destroyed them and escape to the north, possibly even New Brunswick. The two armies met at Princeton, New Jersey. His Majesty 17th Regiment of Foot, 16th Light Dragoons, and 55th Regiment of Foot engaged in a battle against the Continental Army for survival. Washington's men outnumbers the British and pushes them back to take the field. This was yet another smashing victory for General Washington during the most desperate hours. Unfortunately, General Hugh Mercer was bayoneted to death on the field. Washington and his army escaped and made winter camp in Morristown, New Jersey, where they were protected by the Watchung Mountain chain.

As of this writing in January 2016, Princeton Battlefield is literally under attack. The Institute of Advanced Studies is currently via bulldozing in expanse of Maxwell's field. This field is the location of General Washington's brave counter attack on the 17th Regiment of Foot. There is an ongoing battle in the courts as we type. In an effort to raise awareness, the 3rd New Jersey Regiment and the 17th Regiment of Foot (Visit 17th Regiment of Foot here) reenactors contributed greatly to a real-time tour and illumination ceremony at Princeton Battlefield. In an emergency effort, a group of twenty plus soldiers were thrown together in varying impressions and successfully participated in the tour. The tour was a great success and we hope our peace on this day will help preserve Princeton Battlefield for years to come.

2015

Battle of Trenton, December 2015

The crossing of the Delaware River by George Washington and the Continental Army on Christmas Day in 1776, goes down as one of the biggest turning events of the revolution. Defeat after defeat had forced the Americans across the Delaware River and put the British into winter camp. With enlistments running out, Washington gambled everything on a surprise attack on Trenton, New Jersey. Here near 1,200 Hessians encamped in winter garrison. After a smashing success, the Hessians were captured and routed completely.

The 3rd New Jersey Greys were busy fortifying Fort Ticonderoga during this historic event. This did not stop the recreated 3rd New Jersey & Pennsylvania State Regiment from portraying the ragtag 16th Continentals Regiment. The group arrived at the Thompson Neely House the morning before the march and scouted the grounds to set up camp. Hours were spent drilling with and without muskets in time with drum and fife. Pickets were set around the camp all night to secure the grounds and rations were issued to all soldiers in camp. At 3:00 AM, the men and camp followers were formed and silently marched out of camp crossing through a creek at the dead of night. Upon reaching the graves of over 20 fallen comrades, the men stopped and gave a salute by presenting their firelocks. After a moment of silence, the men moved out and marched 6 miles to Washington's Crossing where they cold camped and rested for a short time. After crossing the Delaware River, we continued the march following the original footsteps of our ancestors to Trenton and met up with the 1st New Jersey Regiment (Visit 1st New Jersey Regiment here) on the way. We arrived at the location where the Americans attacked from in 1776 and ran into the rest of the Continental Army to form up for battle. We were given the honor of capturing a Hessian field piece after scouting ahead of the Continental Army. Later, we surrounded the Hessians on the field and our men over at Assunpink Creek corralled them. We had the honor of placing a guard on them and marching them out under captivity. After the battle, the 3rd New Jersey Greys concluded their day arriving at the Trenton Old Barracks (Visit Old Barracks here) with our captives. The day was a huge success.

Crossing The Delaware River, December 2015

On Christmas night 1776, General Washington made his famous crossing of the Delaware River to attack the Hessians in Trenton. It was this maximum effort, that began a turning point in the Revolutionary War.

The 3rd New Jersey Regiment Greys were happy to participate in the Crossing of the Delaware River in 2016. For this years rehearsal, we boasted excellent numbers of over 12 men, not including music. One of the 3rd New Jersey Regiment's biggest goals is always to keep moving. This we accomplish with consistent marching and drilling, which immediately caught the eye of many a visitor. The day went quite smooth as we practice in time with the drum and while a few pictures were taken of us. We formed up with the rest of the army and soon quick-marched to our position at the advanced boat. Being the first to cross, we secured the opposite shore and performed crowd control. It was a great event!

Knox's Noble Train Of Artillery, December 2015

When General Washington surrounded the British in Boston and took Dorchester Heights, it was cannons that convinced the British that it was time to evacuate. General Washington had sent Henry Knox, a Boston book seller, to Fort Ticonderoga to fetch as many cannons as he could. It took over a month, but eventually Knox arrived with the cannons to support the Continental Army surrounding Boston.

The 3rd New Jersey Greys were fortunate to be invited by Fort Ticonderoga
(Visit Fort Ticonderoga here) to participate in their Knox Artillery train. The plan was to stay overnight in the soldier huts that we had helped built the year before and deconstruct the cannons to place them on recently created sleds. With the help of Fort Ticonderoga staff, volunteers, and our good friends, we moved three light cannons onto sleds, which were then taken away by horse and ox. It was a fanatic chance to do something we have never done before working with animals. The fort has plans to expand their live stock programs in the future.

New York Historical Society, November 2015

In Spring of 1776, the 3rd Jersey Greys landed on Manhattan Island and were reviewed by General George Washington. General Washington was astounded at the professionalism of the Jersey Greys and gave major compliments. The Jersey Greys were then shipped off in support of the Northern Campaign.

We had an overwhelming response of New Jersey Greys and Blues show up for a day of interpretation and interaction with the public at New York Historical Society
(Visit New York Historical Society here). Soldiers stood guard on the front steps, while the audience was entertained by the historic melodies coming from the fife and drum performances. Inside the New York Historical Society, three long tables were setup with an assortment of interesting artifacts that the public could pick up and interact with. There was a mock Lean-to, small encampment set up for museum guest to try on clothes, accoutrements, and taking pictures with some of the soldiers. There was also toy muskets for the younger kids to fall in and practice a few simple drills. Over on the other side of the lobby, a small group of Greys formed a circle and conducted a sewing workshop for the public to see how soldiers would make repairs to their clothes. Overall it was a fast paced high energy level of quality interactions with the public. From start to finish the museum was flooded with tourist that seemed to flock all of our members at each of the inviting stations.

Fort Lee Retreat To Victory, November 2015

By mid November 1776, the British have captured Fort Washington and then invaded northern New Jersey. As they closed in on Fort Lee, General Washington ordered a retreat of his army south. This would begin the great Retreat To Victory. This was the beginning of the trek that lead to the Crossing of the Delaware.

To commemorate this historic retreat, members of the Brigade of the American Revolution (Visit Brigade of the American Revolution here) convene at Fort Lee and interpret to the public what happened. A small battle is fought on the ground at the recreated block house. The 3rd New Jersey Greys went in support of the Brigade of the American Revolution and combined with our parent regiment, the 3rd New Jersey Blues (Visit 3rd New Jersey Blues here), for a great reenactment.

Twin Forts Day, October 2015

October 6th 1777, the 5th New York Regiment (Visit 5th New York Regiment here) suffered catastrophic defeat at the hands of the enemy outnumbering them 5 to 1. The Americans at Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton were crushed while gallantly defending the massive iron chain that crossed the Hudson River. In an attempt to assist General Burgoyne, General Clinton sailed north and ran head long into the Twin Forts and was forced to take them. In memoriam of all the brave men that died at Fort Montgomery, the battle is reenacted every year at Fort Montgomery (Visit Fort Montgomery here).

The 3rd New Jersey Greys were honored this year with the invitation to portray the Orange County Militia. Unfortunately due to lack of Redcoats, the 3rd New Jersey Greys and friends portrayed the Loyalist Militia and Regulars. While smaller than previous years, the event was still fun and we did our best to honor those who fought here.

Battle of Germantown, October 2015

The Battle of Germantown, fought in October 1777, was General Washington's attempt in retaking the lost city of Philadelphia. After General Howe outflanked General Washington at Brandywine and took Philadelphia without a fight, an attempt had to be made to secure the city. Four Continental columns converged on the British outpost at Germantown and successfully pushed the 2nd Light Infantry and the 40th Regiment of Foot out of their camp. The 40th Regiment of Foot used a local mansion as a fortress and held off repeated American attacks. However, the Continental Army stalled at the mansion during a heavy fog. This caused mass confusion between the Continental columns that led them into friendly fire. Due to the stalled American movements, the British Army pushed the Americans beyond from where they started. The 3rd New Jersey Regiment played a pivotal role in this battle. After the 6th Pennsylvania (Visit 6th Pennsylvania here) was beaten back, the 3rd New Jersey took its place to charge the house trying to dislodge the 40th Regiment of Foot (Visit 40th Regiment of Foot here). The 3rd New Jersey made it to the doorstep and tried to force through the windows, but were unable to gain a foothold.

This year the 3rd New Jersey Grey's were fortunate to attend the recreated Battle of Germantown. With such a rich history connected to the 3rd New Jersey, we wanted to do our best to be a part of this. Attacking down the street, we ran into stiff resistance, but continued to push them back into the house. The Continental Army did its best to gain entry to the house just as our fore fathers did, but we were beaten. Upon a parlay, in which our officer was shot, the 3rd New Jersey charged once again, but unfortunately could not dislodge the enemy.

Brown’s Raid at Fort Ticonderoga, September 2015

Late Summer 1777, the British invasion under General Burgoyne is nearing its high mark. The Americans are gathering to resist the British as they near Saratoga, New York. Miles to the north, the British captured Fort Ticonderoga in the early Summer using the fortress as a supply base. In an effort to help the American cause, a force of near 1,500 Militia from Vermont and New Hampshire set out to surprise and harass the British at Fort Ticonderoga. This raid under Colonel John Brown, was a successful endeavor to cut the bBritish supply lines and cause as much confusion as possible in Burgoyne's rear. The Americans surrounded the fort and captured hundreds of British and freed many Continental soldiers and
destroyed many well needed supplies.

The 3rd New Jersey Grey's were fortunate to be invited and fall in with Fort Ticonderoga's (Visit Fort Ticonderoga here) company. A group of near 50 men came together and recreated John Werner's Regiment of Vermont State Rangers. Dressed in civilian clothes, we followed our officer and fellow NJ Officer, Nick, on a multiple day adventure that involved overnight woods camping and storming of positions on Mount Defiance. Heavy woods fighting, period correct rations, and mess and the final pitch battle of the weekend. Although the weather was less than ideal, the men drilled and trained and the event was a smashing success. It is an event like this, that creates some of the best memories we had. Our thanks to the staff at Fort Ticonderoga, as well as the B.A.R., Continental Line, and British Brigade for this experience.

*For more Brown's Raid photos, visit DriftingFocus Photography here.

Old Sturbridge Village, August 2015

This was the 3rd New Jersey Greys first at the Rebels and Redcoats event at Old Sturbridge Village (Visit Old Sturbridge Village here). A small number advanced contingent arrived Friday night and slept under the open sky. Saturday, the rest of the company arrived and began drilling in ernest. We were fortunate enough to have drummers, Eric Lichack and William Doyle, to perform our music. The drill of the day was marching in slow step and transitioning to the quick march on the fly. After some parade ground practice, the men and music marched around the town green. It was a spectacular performance. Later, the 3rd New Jersey Greys and two members of the 1st New Jersey, along with our music, headed out to the field to fight. The Jersey Greys performed admirably and plugged gaps in the American Line and upon withdrawing, reorganized a stout defense. We were the last to leave the field. Although most of us day tripped, a fantastic dinner was prepared by our camp follower, Jennifer Wilbur. It was a solid event and look forward to next years.

New York Historical Society, July & August 2015

In Spring of 1776, the 3rd Jersey Greys landed on Manhattan Island and were reviewed by General George Washington. General Washington was astounded at the professionalism of the Jersey Greys and gave major compliments. The Jersey Greys were then shipped off in support of the Northern Campaign.

The recreated 3rd New Jersey Greys returned to Manhattan Island in July 2015 to see the Frigate Hermione and in conjunction, worked with the New York Historical Society in support of their Lafayette exhibit. Here we interacted with the public and spread the word of the New York Historical Society exhibits. It was a pleasure to tell the 3rd New Jersey story and
provided a service to a great historical society.

L'Hermione Visits NYC, July 2015

Everybody is familiar with Lafayette, whether it be a street name or baseball field. The Marquis de Lafayette, the infamous 'Boy General', was a staple in the curation of our brave nation. Lesser known other than perhaps to Harry Potter fans, is the name Hermione. The L'Hermione is the ship that brought Marquis de Lafayette to America in 1780 as he returned with news of support from the King of France.

So 17 years and 35 million dollars later after the project was started, the modern recreated L'Hermione, left France for its tour of North America. The beautifully made Frigate landed in Virginia and over the course of 2 months, made its way to Nova Scotia. The 3rd New Jersey Regiment, Captain Bloomfield's Company, was fortunate to visit the L'Hermione as it docked in NYC in July 2015. Our parent regiment, Jersey Blues,
(Visit Jersey Blues here), met us in the city and we made our way to the glorious ship. Climbing aboard the L'Hermione, we toured the upper deck and met with our friend and crew member, Adam Hodges-LeClaire. Adam had sailed with the crew from France to cross the Atlantic Ocean and portrayed French Marines, a sailor, and the Marquis himself. The 3rd New Jersey Grey's and Blues had an amazing time visiting the L'Hermione and were sad to see her return to France.

Battle of Monmouth, June 2015

The Battle of Monmouth, fought on June 28th 1778, was one of the last major engagements fought in the Mid-Atlantic Campaign. With the French alliance coming to fruition, the British realized they could not maintain garrison in both Philadelphia and New York. General Henry Clinton, who had taken over command from Lord Howe, decided to return the main army to New York. The route, in which he chose, was to cross mainland New Jersey. Washington was close on his heels with the recently retrained Continental Army. The Americans caught up with the British rear guard around Monmouth Courthouse and the battle ensued. Well more of a draw than anything, the British withdrew and the Americans claimed victory. The 3rd New Jersey regiment was present at the Battle of Monmouth and saw action on June 28 as the Jersey Blues. (Visit Jersey Blues here).

For Monmouth 2015, the 3rd New Jersey Grey's teamed up with our friends, the Pennsylvania State Regiment (PSR), and created a composite company representing the Jersey Blues on that faithful day. This was a shining moment in our efforts as we actively engaged in a progressive-style campaign camp at a mainstream event. With the help of the State of New Jersey and Monmouth Battle Site Association (Visit Monmouth Battle Site Association here), we were able to recreate multiple brush shelters and a field kitchen. The public loved it! On the field, we chose a more first person fighting style and were very active in the center of the battle. Afterwards, our recreated company was tasked by the historical site to perform marching and firing demonstrations. We were more than eager for the task. With the rain storm and the muddy experience we gained, this easily became one of the highlights of the year. We can not wait for next year!

School of the Soldier, April 2015

As part of the Brigade of the American Revolution, the 3rd New Jersey Grey's had to pass an inspection of authenticity and character. The 3rd New Jersey Grey's did their best for the inspection and passed with flying colors. The inspector was very happy with our documentation and attitude as were our parent organization, the Jersey Blues.
(Visit Jersey Blues here). It was very special to have the inspection on the grounds of New Windsor Cantonment. This was the location of the last major Continental Army camp before the entire army disbanded. The next day, some of our camp followers ventured over to Knox's Headquarters. This was the location of the armies artillery park during the final encampment.

The Riot at Fort Ticonderoga, January 2015

In late December of 1776, the Patriot Army at Fort Ticonderoga was in turmoil. The Pennsylvania Buckskins and the New England Yankees were at each others throats. The hard cold winter has taken a toll on the men and finally, a drunken dispute turned into a Riot. In a brother versus brother match, the Yankees and Buckskins broke into a fight. The Riot was only put down when Colonel Anthony Wayne brought some reliable troops and threathened with volley fire. The 3rd New Jersey Regiment was stationed nearby at the Sandy Redoubt and Mount Independence and witnessed this Riot.

We were very fortunate to be invited to this event by Fort Ticonderoga and had an amazing time recreating this little known event. Ironically through research, we found out the 3rd New Jersey had its own bone to pick with the Pennsylvanians after laboring in the cold for hours digging the graves for past comrades. The Pennsylvania troops took the Jersey graves for their own dead. Not to have Jersey graves disgraced by Pennsylvania bodies, the 3rd New Jersey dug up the bodies and replaced them with their own. Amazing history!

2014

Battle of Trenton, December 2014

The crossing of the Delaware River by George Washington and the Continental Army on Christmas Day in 1776, goes down as one of the biggest turning events of the revolution. Defeat after defeat had forced the Americans across the Delaware River and put the British into winter camp. With enlistments running out, Washington gambled everything on a surprise attack on Trenton, New Jersey. Here near 1,200 Hessians encamped in winter garrison. After a historic success, the Hessians were captured and routed completely.

The 3rd New Jersey Grey's were busy fortifying Fort Ticonderoga during this historic event. This did not stop the recreated 3rd New Jersey from portraying the ragtag 16th Continentals Regiment. The group camped overnight at the Thompson Neely House, part of Washington's Crossing State Park, and after placing pickets and issuing rations, General Washington made grand rounds and inspected the camp. At 4:10 am, the men were formed and marched 5 miles to Washington's Crossing where they cold camped and rested for an hour. After crossing the river, we met with more soldiers and recreated the march to Trenton. We arrived at the location where the Americans attacked from in 1776 and almost immediately fell into reenactment battle. We were given the honor of capturing a Crown field piece. Later, we surrounded the Hessians on the field. After the battle, the 3rd New Jersey Grey's and comrades received the honor of taking down the colors for
Trenton Old Barracks. (Visit Old Barracks here). The day was a smashing success.

Washington's Crossing, December 2014

On Christmas night 1776, General Washington made his famous crossing of the Delaware River to attack the Hessians in Trenton. It was this maximum effort, that began a turning point in the Revolutionary war.

While the 3rd New Jersey Regiment did not participate in this crossing, we decided to portray the 16th Continental Regiment as they crossed the Delaware River. The Washington's Crossing Association does a fantastic job every year of recreating this crossing in their reproduction Durham boats with the cooperation of many reenactor groups.

March to Trenton Trial Run, December 2014

The 3rd New Jersey Greys decided to sponsor a March to Trenton in December 2014. In preparation for this march, a few members of the Jersey Greys ran a dry run, marching the route of the canal. Upon arriving in Trenton, we met with friends at the Old Trenton Barracks. It was great to get acquainted with the Old Trenton Barracks and visit their Tailor Shop. Its extraordinary to see living history done right! The dry run helped us realize what we needed to make this March To Trenton event happen. Good planning goes a long way!

Battle of Fort Lee, November 2014

In November 1776, the British land in Northern Jersey forcing the evacuation out of Fort Lee. It was here Washington's Retreat began, ending with the Crossing of the Delaware, and later the Attack on Trenton.

The first large event the Jersey Grey's attended was the Memorial at Fort Lee. THIS RETREAT TO VICTORY HAPPENS EVERY NOVEMBER IN REMEBERENCE OF THE EVACUATION OF FORT LEE. We were proud to join with our parent regiment, The Jersey Blues, at the Brigade of the American Revolution event commemorating the RETREAT TO VICTORY.

Fort Ticonderoga, November 2014

On November 2, 1777, the 3rd New Jersey Regiment arrived at Fort Ticonderoga in support of the defense there. The British invasion had reached Fort Ticonderoga in days prior and had been turned back by well constructed and fully manned defenses.

In honor of the 3rd New Jersey arrival, a little group of the Jersey Greys made there way to Fort Ticonderoga historical site and spent the night in the recreated soldiers huts of the 4th Pennsylvania Battalion. During the summer, the Jersey Greys helped built these huts and it was a pleasure to stay overnight in them.

Jockey Hollow, October 2014

Captain Bloomfield spent the Winter of 1776/77 at the Wick House shown here, while the rest of the 3rd New Jersey Regiment was at Fort Ticonderoga. Upon completion of the entitlements, the men marched to Morristown where they were weakened by the harsh winter.

The first uniforms the 3rd New Jersey Greys created were by Sergeant Paul and Regimental Tailor Pat. Before trying them out, they traveled to Jockey Hollow and spent some time speaking to the public. This once vast Continental Army camp is now a picturesque park and fantastic historical site. The 3rd New Jersey Greys hope to be working with them in the future.